Tolerance.ca
Director / Editor: Victor Teboul, Ph.D.
Looking inside ourselves and out at the world
Independent and neutral with regard to all political and religious orientations, Tolerance.ca® aims to promote awareness of the major democratic principles on which tolerance is based.
Human Rights Observatory
Wednesday, October 14, 2020
Click to expand Image Residents of Naunde, in Macomia, Cabo Delgado, flee their village following an attack on June 5, 2018.  ©2018 Human Rights Watch The European Union has agreed to a request by the Mozambican government for help combatting the Islamist armed group Al-Sunna wa Jama’a. The insurgency began in October 2017 and affects several districts in the northern province of Cabo Delgado. Fighting between the group and government forces has left more than 1,500 civilians dead, displaced more than 250,000, and resulted in more than 700,000 people needing emergency assistance. The… (Full Story)
Wednesday, October 14, 2020
(Bangkok) – Cambodian authorities should immediately and unconditionally drop the charges and release an opposition activist arrested in Pursat province, Human Rights Watch said today. Click to expand Image Chum Sarath, in a photograph posted to former CNRP parliamentarian Kong Saphea’s Facebook page, October 6, 2020. Source: Kong Saphea/Facebook On October 6, 2020, police arrested Chum Sarath, a former elected commune councilor from dissolved opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP) in Anlong Reap commune, Pursat province. The charges date back to a land dispute in 2014… (Full Story)
Tuesday, October 13, 2020
Click to expand Image Chinese Vice-Foreign Affairs Minister Le Yucheng speaks during the Human Rights Council's Universal Periodic Review of China, at the European headquarters of the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, November 6, 2018. © 2018 Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP Today, the Chinese government, which is responsible for industrial-scale human rights violations, including the arbitrary detention of a million Turkic Muslims in Xinjiang and the deaths in custody of peaceful critics, such as 2010 Nobel Laureate Liu Xiaobo, was re-elected to the United Nations Human Rights… (Full Story)
Tuesday, October 13, 2020
Click to expand Image An electronic billboard  is displayed on a office building after sunset in Moscow, Russia, April, 11, 2020.  © 2020 AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr My phone number is now supposed to be shared with the Moscow government, along with the numbers of everyone in the city working remotely because of the Covid-19 pandemic. My organization asked if I was fine with that, but according to the Moscow authorities, they don’t need my permission and the employers don’t have a choice. Responding to the rapid spike in Covid-19 cases this autumn, Moscow Mayor Sergey Sobyanin… (Full Story)
Tuesday, October 13, 2020
Click to expand Image Protesters chant slogans against the government in Cairo, Egypt, September 21, 2019. © 2019 AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty Egyptians have many reasons to protest and little space to do so. But over several days in late September, something new happened. In villages and towns stretching from Damietta in the north to Luxor and Aswan in the south, small but widespread street protests erupted predominately in some of the poorest and most remote areas in the country. The protests began on September 20, the first anniversary of 2019 protests called by Mohamed Ali, a self-exiled… (Full Story)
Tuesday, October 13, 2020
Click to expand Image People in Budapest protest a draft law targeting Central European University, Hungary, April 4, 2017. © Lydia Gall/Human Rights Watch The Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) last week ruled the Hungarian government’s 2017 law on higher education violated European Union law. The law put onerous requirements on all foreign universities that operate in Hungary but so obviously targeted the Central European University (CEU) that it was dubbed “Lex CEU.” Though welcome, the ruling starkly demonstrates the limits of the EU response to the systemic rule of law… (Full Story)
Tuesday, October 13, 2020
Click to expand Image Students protest against an alleged gang-rape and brutal torture of a woman in the southern district of Noakhali, in Dhaka, Bangladesh on October 8, 2020.  © 2020 Zabed Hasnain Chowdhury/Sipa via AP Images The Bangladesh government has approved new measures to use the death penalty as punishment for rape, after widespread protests in response to several recent gang rape cases. It’s a bad decision, not only because capital punishment is inherently inhumane and should be abolished, but because it is not a real solution to sexual violence. There is no conclusive evidence… (Full Story)
Tuesday, October 13, 2020
Click to expand Image A pro-democracy protester flashes a three-finger salute during a protest against the government near the Democracy Monument in Bangkok, Thailand, October 13, 2020. © 2020 REUTERS/Panu Wongcha-um (Bangkok) – The Thai authorities should immediately drop all charges and unconditionally release democracy activists arrested for peacefully protesting in Bangkok on October 13, 2020, Human Rights Watch said today. At approximately 3:40 p.m., police forcibly dispersed a pro-democracy protest organized by the People’s Group at Bangkok’s Democracy Monument. Police kicked, punched,… (Full Story)
Tuesday, October 13, 2020
(Washington, DC) – Venezuelan authorities’ treatment of approximately 100,000 citizens returning from other countries in many cases is abusive and is likely to amplify transmission of Covid-19, Human Rights Watch and the Johns Hopkins University’s Centers for Public Health and Human Rights and for Humanitarian Health said today. Foreign affairs ministers from Latin American countries scheduled to meet online the week of October 19, 2020, as part of the Quito Process should urgently address the returnees’ situation. Tens of thousands of Venezuelans, most of whom were living in other Latin American… (Full Story)
Monday, October 12, 2020
Imagine being arrested and taken by police to a doctor who examines your vagina and anus –without your consent. Now imagine you are sent for several of these exams, sometimes with other people watching. Now imagine that these “tests” are scientifically invalid and the “findings” are medically meaningless – but still may be critical in sending you to prison. Click to expand Image A woman prisoner looks out a window in Parwan prison north of Kabul, Afghanistan, in February 2011. The woman was convicted of moral crimes after a man from her neighborhood raped her. She later gave birth… (Full Story)
<<Prev.1 2 3 4 56 7 8 9 10 Next>>

Follow us on ...
Facebook Twitter