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Human Rights Observatory
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
I’ll start with a sentiment I hear a lot when I say I work on older people’s rights: “Oh, nursing homes can be awful, but my dad’s in a good one.” I would hope that everyone living in a facility is living in a “good” one. But unfortunately, that just isn’t the case. And what is more, even in the ones people think are “good” ones, with chandeliers and carpeting, there are risks inherent in the segregation from the outside world, risks in the situation of control a facility has when a person wholly depends on it. We cannot overstate the risks. This year, we documented the widespread inappropriate… (Full Story)
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
Sent via e-mail and regular mail Judicial Council of California Criminal Law Advisory Committee 455 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco, CA 94102-3688 Attn.: Eve Hershcopf Eve.Hershcopf@jud.ca.gov  Kara Partow  Kara.Partow@jud.ca.gov  RE: HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH’S COMMENTS ON PROPOSED CALIFORNIA JUDICIAL COUNCIL RULES 4.10 AND 4.40 In April 2017, Human Rights Watch published “Not in it for Justice: How California’s Pretrial Detention and Bail System Unfairly Punishes Poor People,”[1] a comprehensive report on the impact of pretrial detention.  We have been deeply involved in advocacy for comprehensive… (Full Story)
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
The following are Human Rights Watch’s comments in response to the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) proposed rule, “Inadmissibility on Public Charge Grounds,” published October 10, 2018 (DHS Docket NO. USCIS-2010-0012, RIN 1615-AA22). Human Rights Watch is in strong opposition to the proposed rule because it is likely to chill access to a broad range of programs that support individuals’ basic health, nutrition, and housing needs, for potentially millions of people, including US citizens and legal residents, with a particularly damaging… (Full Story)
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
Expand Marielle Franco during protest in Rio de Janeiro. © Mídia Ninja Human rights defender and Rio de Janeiro councilwoman Marielle Franco should have been with us today, celebrating the 20th anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights Defenders. And she should have been here tomorrow, remembering the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Without Marielle, who was gunned down almost nine months ago, those anniversaries are tinged with profound sadness. Were she with us, Marielle would no doubt speak about those two fundamental documents, not as… (Full Story)
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
Expand The human rights and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela happen after years of dismantling democratic institutions. © 2018 Cesar Muñoz / Human Rights Watch “Gabriela” is a 10-year-old Venezuelan girl paralyzed from the waist down who uses a wheelchair. Two years ago, she had to stop going to the hospital because her family could not afford the trip. At that point, the hospital also could not provide catheters for her. Her family was reusing for months urinary catheters that should have been used once and thrown away, rinsing them instead with vinegar each time.  This led to kidney damage… (Full Story)
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
Expand Eleanor Roosevelt holds up the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), New York, 1948.  © United Nations Photo/Flickr Today we celebrate the 70th anniversary of a living document. Living not because it evolves and adapts to new times through amendments, like a Constitution, but because the values it enshrines and the promise it holds are as relevant today as when the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted it amid the ashes of World War II. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights became seminal because it enshrined a simple yet powerful idea: All human beings are entitled… (Full Story)
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
Why did you decide to create a game? We really wanted to build something that felt accessible, interesting, and reached out to new audiences who might not have realized how encryption was built into the gadgets, apps and websites they use. We asked ourselves how we could build a tool that’s educational and interactive and geared toward a broad audience. And how do we move the conversation away from just government surveillance and national security? How do we get people to think about how encryption helps them, along with vulnerable groups like domestic abuse survivors? A game seemed like a good… (Full Story)
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
(Bangkok, December 3, 2018)—We, the 16 undersigned organizations, call on the Thai authorities and Thammakaset Company Limited to ensure that the criminal and civil defamation complaints brought by the company against human rights defenders Nan Win and Sutharee Wannasiri for bringing attention to labor rights violations at a Thammakaset-owned chicken farm in Thailand do not proceed. The Bangkok Criminal Court is scheduled to hold preliminary hearings on the criminal defamation complaints on December 3. The company—a Thai-owned poultry company in Lopburi Province—should also withdraw all criminal… (Full Story)
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
Why did you decide to create a game? We really wanted to build something that felt accessible, interesting, and reached out to new audiences who might not have realized how encryption was built into the gadgets, apps and websites they use. We asked ourselves how we could build a tool that’s educational and interactive and geared toward a broad audience. And how do we move the conversation away from just government surveillance and national security? How do we get people to think about how encryption helps them, along with vulnerable groups like domestic abuse survivors? A game seemed like a good… (Full Story)
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
Expand Migrants including asylum seekers in a dilapidated building in Borici camp, Bihac, Bosnia Herzegovina. November 19, 2018. © 2018 Human Rights Watch (Budapest) – Croatian police are pushing migrants and asylum seekers back to Bosnia and Herzegovina, in some cases violently, and without giving them the possibility to seek asylum, Human Rights Watch said. Human Rights Watch interviewed 20 people, including 11 heads of families and 1 unaccompanied boy, who said that Croatian police deported them to Bosnia and Herzegovina without due process after detaining them deep inside Croatian territory.… (Full Story)
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