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Human Rights Observatory
Friday, April 3rd 2020
Related Content Human Rights Dimensions of COVID-19 Response What are your main concerns about the coronavirus moving through Africa? In many countries where we work there is an extremely weak public health and healthcare infrastructure. The fact that the spread in Africa has been slower than elsewhere is a bit of a comfort and hopefully gives governments time to put infrastructure in place. Unfortunately, we haven’t seen much of that happening. There are inadequate opportunities for testing and treatment, and we know there are likely many more cases than have been reported. Also, the pandemic… (Full Story)
Friday, April 3rd 2020
Expand A member of the Yangon City and Development Committee disinfects government offices to help curb the spread of the new coronavirus in Yangon, Myanmar on Wednesday, March 25, 2020.  © 2020 AP Photo/Thein Zaw (Bangkok) – Myanmar authorities should immediately move to limit the spread of the COVID-19 virus by reducing the populations of the country’s overcrowded and unsanitary prisons, Human Rights Watch said today. Myanmar confirmed its first COVID-19 related death on March 31, 2020. Myanmar’s prison system, made up of 46 prisons and 50 labor camps nationwide, holds an estimated 92,000… (Full Story)
Friday, April 3rd 2020
What are some of your biggest concerns about the coronavirus moving through Europe and Central Asia? Europe is one of the world’s epicenters of COVID-19 cases. There’s an awful death toll in Italy and Spain with the numbers of dead going up dramatically every day, also in France and the United Kingdom. We’re really concerned for the general public across the region. From the human rights perspective, it’s about making sure governments are doing everything they can to uphold and protect the right to health, including access to health services for everyone. It’s key to protect at-risk groups, such… (Full Story)
Friday, April 3rd 2020
Hye Jung Han is a researcher and advocate in the Children’s Rights Division, where she specializes on children’s rights and technology.   Before joining Human Rights Watch, she worked at UNICEF, where she advised teams across the world on the ethical use of data and technologies to deliver assistance to the world’s most vulnerable children. She has also worked to deliver humanitarian aid to children and families with UNICEF South Sudan and with the United Nations Peacekeeping Mission in South Sudan, and was seconded to the World Food Progamme to support cross-border negotiations. These experiences… (Full Story)
Friday, April 3rd 2020
Expand A screenshot of an officer with five youths locked inside a dog cage after breaking curfew in Laguna province, the Philippines on March 20, 2020.  © 2020 Facebook Philippine authorities have subjected children to absurdly abusive treatment for violating curfew and quarantines rules imposed to limit exposure to COVID-19. Police and local officials in several parts of the country have mistreated people detained for violating COVID-19 regulations, including by confining them to dog cages and forcing them to sit for hours in the midday sun. Reports shared with Human Rights Watch by child… (Full Story)
Friday, April 3rd 2020
Expand Rainbow flags symbolizing LGBT rights. © 2017 Reuters Living in a shelter for homeless people shouldn’t be illegal. But according to Ugandan police, 23 people living at a shelter serving lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people in Kampala are guilty of “a negligent act likely to spread infection of disease,” as well as “disobedience of lawful orders.” Police were presumably enforcing presidential directives to combat the spread of COVID-19, including one prohibiting public gatherings of more than 10 people. The homeless youth were indoors at a shelter in Nsangi, near Kampala,… (Full Story)
Friday, April 3rd 2020
Expand Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, center right, speaks during a plenary session in the House of Parliament in Budapest, Hungary, Monday, March 23, 2020. © 2020 Tamas Kovacs/MTI via AP On March 31, the Hungarian government submitted a bill to parliament that, among other things, would  make it impossible for transgender people to legally change their gender. It was unclear when parliament might debate and vote on the bill. The proposed amendment to the Registry Act would include a clarification regarding the word “nem,” which in Hungarian can mean both “sex” and “gender,” to specifically… (Full Story)
Amnesty International - Friday, April 3rd 2020
Although it’s good news that José Daniel Ferrer García can finally go home, instead of remaining in prison, where he would be at greater risk of COVID-19, his conviction and sentencing is still shameful. He should have never been detained for peacefully expressing his ideas in the first place. (Full Story)
Amnesty International - Friday, April 3rd 2020
As we enter an uncertain and unprecedented period of modern history, Amnesty International in the Americas brings you this blog with some of the most critical threats to human rights linked to the COVID-19 pandemic across the continent. On a constant basis (unless the context overwhelms us), our researchers and campaigners will provide analysis and examples of human rights violations from Alaska to Argentina, as well as details of current and upcoming investigations in this context of upheaval. (Full Story)
Friday, April 3rd 2020
Expand People wearing masks, attend a vigil for Chinese doctor Li Wenliang, in Hong Kong, February 7, 2020. © 2020 AP Photo/Kin Cheung For authoritarian-minded leaders, the coronavirus crisis is offering a convenient pretext to silence critics and consolidate power. Censorship in China and elsewhere has fed the pandemic, helping to turn a potentially containable threat into a global calamity. The health crisis will inevitably subside, but autocratic governments’ dangerous expansion of power may be one of the pandemic’s most enduring legacies. In times of crisis, people’s health depends at… (Full Story)
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