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Tuatara are ancient, slow and endangered. But their super speedy sperm could boost conservation efforts

By Sarah Lamar, PhD Researcher, Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington
Dr Diane Ormsby, Senior Lecturer, Reproductive and Developmental Biology, Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington
Jennifer Moore, Associate Professor of Biology and Natural Resources, Grand Valley State University
Nicola Jane Nelson, Professor of Conservation Biology, Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington
Susan N. Keall, Senior Technical Officer - Conservation Ecology, Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington
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The male anatomy of tuatara, the last representatives of an ancient lineage, is unique among reptiles. They lack a penis, which has made sperm collection a major challenge – until now.


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