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Best evidence suggests antidepressants aren't very effective in kids and teens. What can be done instead?

By Sarah Hetrick, Associate Professor of Youth Mental Health, University of Auckland
Joanne McKenzie, Associate Professor, Biostatistics Unit, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University
Nick Meader, Research Fellow, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York
Sally Merry, Professor and Cure Kids Duke Family Chair in Child and Adolescent Mental Health, University of Auckland
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Even before COVID-19 lockdowns, school closures and strict social distancing, depression was on the rise in children and teenagers around the globe.

By the age of 19, around 25% of adolescents are estimated to have experienced a depressive episode. By the age of 30, this…


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