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We've smuggled tiny diamonds into cells, where they could shine light on the development of cancer

By Elke Hebisch, Researcher, Department of Solid State Physics, Lund University
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Over the years, scientists have put together an amazing array of microscopic markers that they can place within cells whenever they need to label and observe distinct parts of a cell’s interior. Such labelling is used for a wide array of research, including cancer research.

But sneaking these markers into cells, through the membrane that protects them from unwanted substances, is far from easy. Creating too wide a breach in the cell membrane when injecting the markers can be fatal for the cell. Plus, once they’re smuggled inside, many markers are actually toxic – and are either attacked…


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