Tolerance.ca
Looking inside ourselves and out at the world
Independent and neutral with regard to all political and religious orientations, Tolerance.ca® aims to promote awareness of the major democratic principles on which tolerance is based.

Inside Story - Libya's long road to democracy

Nine months after the end of Libya's uprising, Libyans head to the polls for the first free elections in decades. They will elect a 200-member assembly that will be called the General National Congress. This body will appoint a prime minister and draft a new constitution. The road to democracy has been a tumultuous one for the people of Libya - the National Transition Council which has run the country since Muammar Gaddafi was toppled, has struggled to maintain security or deal with competing claims for regional autonomy. Many Libyans hope that the elections mark a step forward in a country that has been crippled by uncertainty and insecurity, but the new government will have to confront a series of major issues: - The transitional government has failed to break the stranglehold of the militias that helped to remove Gaddafi. Many now use their firepower for political advantage. A new government will have to find a way to disband them and integrate into a regular, unified army. -Since Gaddafi's overthrow, tribal, regional and ethnic divisions have paralysed Libya. A new government will have to manage renewed claims for autonomy in the country's eastern province as well as in the south. -A lack of security is also leading to armed clashes. Libya's new rulers will have to work swiftly to establish the rule of law and build a justice system that will serve as Libyans' only recourse for settling disputes. -As the world's fifth largest producer of oil, many Libyans hoped their country would become a magnet for investment. But the collapse of authority has left the country's economy in tatters. So, what are the hurdles in Libya's process of transition? And will the people's representatives be able to bridge the many divisions in the post-Gaddafi era? Inside Story, with presenter Mike Hanna, discusses with guests: Abdulmuneim Sbeta, a civil society activist and chairman of Libya's leading NGO, the national support group; Mohamed Eljarh, an academic and specialist on Libyan affairs; and Anas El Gomati, the director of governance and security at a Tripoli based think-tank, Sadeq Institute.

© DailyMotion -


Comment on this article!
To post a comment, we encourage you to become a member of Tolerance.ca® or log in if you are already a member. You can still post your commentwithout registering, but you will need to fill your personal information each time.

Become a member (free)   |   Log in

Postings are subject to the terms and conditions of Tolerance.ca®. Before submitting your message , you must read the Terms and conditions of Tolerance.ca® and agree to them by checking the box below.
Your name:
Email:
Heading:
Message:
 
  I have read and agree to the Terms and conditions of Tolerance.ca®.
Follow us on ...
Facebook Twitter