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Endangered Hainan Gibbons Suffer From Loss of Habitat

For more news visit ☛ http://english.ntdtv.comFollow us on Twitter ☛ http://twitter.com/NTDTelevisionAdd us on Facebook ☛ http://me.lt/9P8MUnIn the Southern province of Hainan lives an ape species, Hainan Gibbons, that number less than 100 in the world. They and other endangered species living in the region face the threat of habitat fragmentation. Here's more.In Hainan, China, the country's largest rainforest also houses a number of exotic and endangered wildlife species. In particular, the Hainan gibbons, are a rare ape species, and number only 23 in the world. The gibbons live in the Bawangling National Nature Reserve. But their habitat is in danger because of agricultural development. The 43-page Greenpeace report states plantations have already taken over 13% of the forests. But habitat is the key to preserving endangered species.[Yi Lan, Greenpeace Forest Campaigner]"The situation is still grim. I just mentioned the Hainan gibbons are the only primates with a population of less than a hundred, so they are still critically endangered. Most conservationists think if we want to protect the Hainan gibbons, the key is to protect their habitat. We need to solve the problem of their habitat's destruction."Greenpeace's handout video shows a row of gum trees, a plant not native to the natural habitat. "It does have an effect. The river level drops, because they plant gum trees. You need a lot of water to plant gum trees, so it causes a fall in water level."The destruction of habitat is one of the primary dangers for Hainan Gibbons. Hainan Gibbons closely escaped extinction in the 1980's numbering only seven in the world. Since then, numbers have increased to 23.

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